In other words:

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Diane and Ben on the video set for “Too Hot To Stop,” 1987

“I remember one of the happiest days of my life was when we did our first promotional tour for the album. We were in Cleveland and riding in the backseat of the promoter’s car when ‘Stay the Night’ came on the radio for the first time. We were so excited and yelling like kids!” — Diane Grey Page, Let’s Go! Benjamin Orr and The Cars by Joe Milliken

Lyrics: Moving In Stereo

“Moving In Stereo” by The Cars

Life’s the same, I’m moving in stereo

Life’s the same except for my shoes

Life’s the same, you’re shaking like tremolo

Life’s the same, it’s all inside of you

 

It’s so easy to blow up your problems, it’s so easy to play up your breakdown

It’s so easy to fly through a window, it’s so easy to fool with the sound

 

It’s so tough to get up, it’s so tough

It’s so tough to live up, it’s so tough on you

 

Life’s the same, I’m moving in stereo

Life’s the same except for my shoes

Life’s the same, you’re shaking like tremolo

Life’s the same, it’s all inside of you

 

Life’s the same, I’m moving in stereo

Life’s the same except for my shoes

Life’s the same, you’re shaking like tremolo

Life’s the same, it’s all inside of you

 

Quoting Benjamin

On writing lyrics for The Lace: “I didn’t have a lot of success. Lyrics are my weakest point. I don’t listen to a song for the first five or six times for the lyrics, I listen for the melody. Never really pay attention to the lyrics until after that point. [My desire was] to tell a story. Just something you would actually say to someone, rather than one line and then something clever to rhyme with it.” — from “Benjamin Orr: The Cars’ Mr. Casual Steps Out” by Rob Tannenbaum, Musician Magazine, March 1987

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It reminds me of him.

273cf0b5359327e0feef28812a51d1a7“I was (and still am) aware of the good fortune that hard work has brought me. I don’t want to seem ungrateful. I also genuinely like people. I want to get to know them in a real way. I am bummed out at the concept that someone just wants a scribble from you, when it’s clear they’ve never seen your work, they just know you’re ‘famous.’

“I began to feel a counterintuitive, melancholy loneliness and even low-grade anger at these moments. I didn’t like the way it made me feel when a passing car full of teenage girls screeched to a halt, emptying the crazed occupants, who bull-rushed me, pointing, screaming, and laughing. Years later, someone will call this phenomenon ‘objectification.’ Then, I didn’t really know that I was being treated like an object. I did, however, begin to treat some people the way they treated me.”

— Rob Lowe, Stories I Only Tell My Friends

In other words:

“Ben was just a terrific singer… he reminded me of Rutger Hauer but with a great voice! I didn’t know The Cars well in the early days, but got to know Ben a little bit in his post-Cars days. He was a great guy, very talented, and a real pro in the studio.” — Charlie Farren, Boston-area vocalist and guitar player, Let’s Go! Benjamin Orr and The Cars, by Joe Milliken

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1993. Charlie Farren (top left) and Brad Delp (bottom right) sang the backing vocals on Ben’s unreleased second solo album. Photo courtesy of Charlie Farren